september 2019

Hakonechloa Macra – Japanese Forest Grass

Hakonechloa, Heuchera ’Sweet tea’ in the front and Heuchera ’Obsidian’ in the back. Iris and Hostas peaking up form the right.

It’s hard to describe how beautiful the Japanese forrest grass is with just a photo. The picture is still while the beauty of this grass lies in its movement. When the wind blows it looks almost like these settle green waves flowing around in the garden.

Hakonechloa, Heuchera ’Sweet tea’

I’ve planted it together with Heucheras for contrast. The combination makes both the plants stand out.

Hakonechloa gets 12-18 in. (30-45cm) tall and 18-24 in. (45-60cm) wide. It prefers part shade, although in my garden it gets only 3-4 h of sun. It’s a slow starter and grows very slowly for the first two years. Year three it takes off and proves it was well worth the wait!

Hakonechloa, Heuchera ’Sweat Tea’, Sweet Woodruff and Clethra alnifolia ‘Hummingbird’ (Summersweet) in the background

My plants are three years old so they have just begun to do their thing.

Succulent Arrangement in Bonsai Pot

Another weekend with dull weather – another succulent arrangement. This time I used a pretty bonsai pot at the local garden center. I chose succulents that go well with the color of the pot – concrete grey with touches of red.

Panda Plant (Kalanchoe Tomentosa)

Succulents need good drainage. That means letting water rinse quickly. Here’s how you keep them happy:

  1. Use a container with drainage whole. My container didn’t have holes so used a regular drill to make two – one on each side of the pot.
  2. Use succulent or cacti potting soil. It’s basically potting soil with sand and grit that allows quick drainage.
  3. Water moderately, especially during the winter months. Every 10-14 days is usually enough.
Echeveria pulidonis (Pulido’s Echeveria), Sedum ’Aurora Blue’, Silver Sparkle Pilea

Make a Small Garden Look Bigger – Incorporate the Surroundings

At the end of my garden is a green boxwood hedge. The green color of the hedge is similar to the color of the large trees in the background. They blend together so well that if you look quickly, it almost looks like they are the same. The hedge adds an impression that these huge trees are part of the garden – making the garden appear much bigger.

Take advantage of you surroundings and incorporate the colors, structures and plants into you garden, especially to the borders.

Behind the boxwood hedge is a small road that the hedge hides so neatly. All you see from the garden are the gorgeous trees.

Simple Water Feature for the Garden

It really doesn’t have to be more complicated than this. A simple shallow container is everything you need to bring a touch of water to the garden.

Make sure that the inside of the container is dark. Darker colors bring forth the reflection in the water.

Höstkrans av torkad Hortensia

Natalia Lindberg Trädgårdsdesign - Höstkrans torkad hortensia

För några veckor sedan ville jag göra en höstkrans av torkad Hortensia. Jag klippte av några blommor från min Hortensia Limelight, satte den i vatten för långsam torkning och väntade på att de skulle torka färdigt. Till min stora förvåning vissnade dem ned. Allihop tappade färg och såg trista ut. Så vad gick fel? Jo, jag klippte dem från busken för tidigt. De var fortfarande mitt i sin blomning, behövde mer vatten och var inte redo att torkas. Klipp hortensiablommorna först ner du ser att de har börjat torka medan kvar på busken.

Klipp blommorna från busken först när du ser att det har börjat torka.

Mitt andra försök gick betydligt mycket bättre, blommorna torkade så vackert så. Här är hur jag torkar hortenisablommor.

Det går bra att använda torkade hortensior som en dekoration hemma, gärna i ett mörkt hörn där inget annat växer. I år använde jag en mix av hortensiablommor för att göra en krans. Det blev en blandning av Limelight, Little Lime och Annabelle-hortensia.

Natalia Lindberg Trädgårdsdesign - Höstkrans torkad hortensia
Höstkrans av torkade hortensiablommor
Natalia Lindberg Trädgårdsdesign - Höstkrans torkad hortensia
En mix av torkad Hortenisa ”Limlight”, ”Hortensia ”Little Lime” och Hortensia ”Annabelle”

Planting Helleborus Orientalis Viv. Victoria

Helleborus Orientalis ’Viv. Victoria’, Heucherella ’Sweet tea’, Japanese Maple ’Orange Dream,’ Boxwood

I’ve been looking for a plant to match my newly planted Heucherellas. To get some inspiration I made a visit to the garden. I didn’t have to look long before I found the Helleborus Orientalis ’Viv. Victoria’. What a beautiful perennial! It matched the Heucherella perfectly with the purple and orange/yellow colors.

The Helleborus and the Heucherella are both evergreen. They will keep their foliage all year-round. They will bring winter interest to the garden when all other plants are sleeping.

Helleborus Orientalis ’Viv. Victoria’

Helleborus Orientalis ’Viv. Victoria’ is a perennial. It grows 10-15 inches (25-40 cm) tall and preferens half shade.

The amazing thing with Hellaborus is that they bloom in the winter for 3-4 months!

This variety will bloom sometime between September and April. It will keep blooming for 3-4 months!

The purple flowers look pretty next to the deep purple Heuchera ’Obsidian’ as well

Hosta ’Francee’ – a Perennial for Sun or Shade

Hosta ’Francee’, Heuchera ’Palace Purple’, Hakonechloa, Yew ’Hillii’

There’s a spot in my garden that gets sun for a few hours during spring and fall. In the summer, however it’s in shade. To meet that type of light requirements I’ve planted Hostas ’Francee’. This type of hosta can take full sun to shade.

About Hosta ’Francee’

Hosta ’Francee’ is wonderful perennial that gets around 18-20 inches (45-50 cm) tall and 35-47 inches (90-120 cm) wide. It takes a few years for it to reach that size but when it does it’s quite a sight. It’s also one few hostas that doesn’t get eaten by slugs.

Companion Plants for Hostas

Heuchera ’Palace Purple looks pretty in front of the hosta since they contrast in color. For further interest I’ve added Hakonechloa and Iris ”Snow Queen”. While they have a similar color as the hosta, they complement each other in texture and form.

Hosta ’Francee’, Heuchera ’Palace Purple’, Hakonechloa, Iris ’Snow Queen’

Fall Arrangement in Terracotta Pots

It’s mid september and the days are getting cooler. As the temperatures drop I add things to the garden that will last all the way into winter. Cold tolerant decorations like moss or pine cones and plants like Heather and Cyclamen.

Heather top-dressed with moss and pine cones will look pretty all the way though winter

The days are shorter days and longer nights during fall and winter. The darker season feel less dull with white and bright colors in the garden.

Water Cyclamens from the bottom by placing the pot on a saucer with water
White Heathers and Cyclamens

Virginia Creeper Climbing Vine

The foliage of the Virginia Creeper goes from deep green to deep, dark red in the fall

In a few weeks the foliage of this Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) will turn deep, dark red. It will look even more dramatic than it already does against the black trellis. This is one gorgeous and tough climber.

Virginia Creeper to the left and Boston Ivy to the right. The two intertwine and will bring year-round interest

I planted the Virginia Creeper just a few months ago and it has grown like crazy, despite half bad conditions. It’s in a shady and dry spot where other plants have died. This one doesn’t seem to mind at all.

The Virginia Creeper can take full sun to shade and pretty much any type of soil.

Climbers are a must in a small garden. They bring lushness and coziness even to the smallest of spaces.

Virginia Creeper to the right and Boston Ivy to the left

Easy to Dry Flowers and Grasses

Sedum ’Herbstfreude’ , Hydrangea ’Annabelle’ & Feather Reed Grass ”Karl Foerster”

Here are three flowers and grasses that are really easy to dry.

#1 Sedum ’Herbstfreude’

Dead easy to dry – just cut and place in a container, no water needed. It stays pretty for a long time!

Sedum ’Herbstfreude’

#2 Hydrangea ’Annabelle’

Have a look at my post about how to dry Hydrangeas. When it comes to this type of Hydrangea, ’Annabelle’, make sure the blooms have turned from cream white to lime green before drying. Otherwise they might loose their form.

Hydrangea ’Annabelle’

#3 Feather Reed Grass ”Karl Foerster”

This grass turns into the most beautiful feather-light form when dried. Just cut and put in a container, no water needed. It might last as long as the first two but in my opinion it’s still worth bringing inside and enjoying for a few weeks.

Feather Reed Grass ”Karl Foerster”

Dried flowers are perfect for the darkest corners of the home. They bring a feeling of nature in spots where house plants won’t grow.